From One Survivor to Another

May 30, 2014
 
reblogged: (via)
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April 29, 2014
misophoniasupport:

notyrqueer:

smilingvibes:

7/11 breathing. A skill to use for anxiety. It’s recommended to do it for 10-15 minutes. Like any other skill it does require a lot of practice. I advice that you practice it when you are feeling calm so you are ready in a time of need. If you lose count, which is easily done, simply start again until you do 15 minutes. It will also help with distraction even if you don’t get it right the first hundred times.

Breathing out longer than you breathe in actually activates your parasympathetic nervous system!
Anxiety is your sympathetic nervous system (“fight or flight”) setting off all the alarms, while breathing like this will set the parasympathetic system (“rest and digest”) into action shutting off the alarms and settling your nerves.
Other things that help: laughing, checking out what’s going on around you (moving head and eyes to orient to your surroundings), getting curious about something.
Take care, be safe.

Please use this, guys, it can really help calm you while being triggered and when you’re in a stressful environment.

this gif moves way faster than it actually works but this is still nice

misophoniasupport:

notyrqueer:

smilingvibes:

7/11 breathing. A skill to use for anxiety. It’s recommended to do it for 10-15 minutes. Like any other skill it does require a lot of practice. I advice that you practice it when you are feeling calm so you are ready in a time of need. If you lose count, which is easily done, simply start again until you do 15 minutes. It will also help with distraction even if you don’t get it right the first hundred times.

Breathing out longer than you breathe in actually activates your parasympathetic nervous system!

Anxiety is your sympathetic nervous system (“fight or flight”) setting off all the alarms, while breathing like this will set the parasympathetic system (“rest and digest”) into action shutting off the alarms and settling your nerves.

Other things that help: laughing, checking out what’s going on around you (moving head and eyes to orient to your surroundings), getting curious about something.

Take care, be safe.

Please use this, guys, it can really help calm you while being triggered and when you’re in a stressful environment.

this gif moves way faster than it actually works but this is still nice

 
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March 14, 2013

Feeling suicidal? Can’t talk on phones?

transbear:

horrorpeach:

crankyskirt:

IMAlive is a live online network that uses instant messaging to respond to people in crisis. People need a safe place to go during moments of crisis and intense emotional pain.

https://www.imalive.org/

Holy shit this is brilliant

(Source: bowtietemporaltraveler)

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March 4, 2013

Six websites I go to when I am upset:

shadowhunterforlife:

babedesev:

missredaholic:

the hugging one actually feels like they’re actually hugging you and you feel so much better

This is amazing

February 10, 2013

safe-media said: Hi! I saw someone ask you about triggering material in a movie, so I wanted to tell you about my blog. This is a place for people to post reviews/descriptions of books, movies and Tv that have trigger and content warnings. Detailed warnings usually get left out of summaries and reviews and I want to help people avoid being surprised by really triggering stuff in popular media.

oo thanks for this!

January 9, 2013

[content warning: rape]

stfufauxminists:

esmeweatherwax:

thesea-wolf:

This Rape Infographic Is Going Viral. Too Bad It’s Wrong.

bibliofeminista:

Sadly, the graphic meant to set the record straight on false accusations only confuses matters. Three major problems jump out:

The graphic assumes one-rape-per-rapist. Looking at the above picture, one might start to get the impression that every other man you meet is a rapist. Nearly one in five women have been raped, according to the latest substantive government numbers, and infographics like this might make people conclude therefore that one in five men is a rapist. In reality, a much smaller (though still troubling) number—an estimated 6 percent of men—are rapists. Your average rapist stacks up six victims. That’s hard to capture in an infographic, but could be clearer by just labeling the little dudes “rapes” instead of “rapists.” After all, the fact that most rapists are repeat offenders drives home how troubling it is that victims can’t find justice. If more rapists saw a jail cell the first time they raped someone, the number of victims would decline dramatically.

The graphic overestimates the number of unreported rapes. It’s hard to measure how many rapes go unreported, because, duh, unreported. Making it even harder to get an accurate count, a lot of rape victims don’t identify as rape victims, because it’s so stigmatized. Still, improved public education has made it easier for rape victims to report. RAINN (the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network), using government numbers,estimates that 54 percent of rapes go unreported. Tweaking the infographic to reflect this more conservative number wouldn’t make the image less convincing, but it would make it more accurate.

The graphic overestimates the number of false accusations. This infographic is intended to drive home how rare false accusations are, and yet, because of a simple error, it overestimates how many actually occur. The problem is that the Enliven Project conflates “false reports,” which only require the claim that a crime has happened, with “false accusations,” which require fingering a supposed perpetrator. This might seem like a small thing, but this report from the National Center for the Prosecution of Violence Against Women, which focuses in part on teaching law enforcement to understand and root out false reports of rape, is very careful to warn against conflating the two. In its list of potential indicators of a false report, the Center specifically singles out the lack of a named perpetrator as something to look out for: 

To summarize material developed by McDowell and Hibler (1987), realistic indicators of a false report could potentially include:

• A perpetrator who is either a stranger or a vaguely described acquaintance who is not identified by name. As previously discussed, most sexual assault perpetrators are actually known to their victims. Identifying the suspect is therefore not typically a problem. However, victims who fabricate a sexual assault report may not want anyone to actually be arrested for the fictional crime. Therefore, they may say that they were sexually assaulted by a stranger or an acquaintance who is only vaguely described and not identified by name.

Emphasis mine. According to the document, 2-8 percent of reported rapes are false, but the number that are false accusations is smaller. Women who make false reports want sympathy, and as victims of real rapes can tell you, accusing a real man usually gets you very little. 

whoops. I reblogged it before I saw this. 

oops me too

Important information about the graphic that I reblogged the other day.

quick summary for people who don’t have time for reading: the infographic incorrectly makes it appear as though each individual rapist only rapes once. the adjusted stats, however, are much better, as it shows false reporting is even rarer than in the original graphic. there’s also some other nuance about the difference between a false report and a false accusation, and how those terms are defined for study.